The world’s largest museum of milk and cheese

The André Besnier Museum of Milk in Laval tells you everything about milk and milk products, with a special place devoted to cheese.

  • Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval

    Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval

    © Photo : jean-Charles Druais

  • Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval : collection de barattes

    Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval : collection de barattes

    © Photo : D. Osso

  • Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval : collection d'étiquettes de camembert

    Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval : collection d'étiquettes de camembert

    © Photo : D. Osso

  • Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval : collection de bidons de lait

    Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval : collection de bidons de lait

    © Photo : D. Osso

  • Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval

    Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval

    © Photo : D. Osso

  • Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval : visite avec dégustation

    Musée du Lactopôle André Besnier à Laval : visite avec dégustation

    © Photo : A. Jung

Evidence of an industrial adventure
The André Besnier Museum of Milk is testimony to the importance of milk, which is produced all over the world and which we have been treating and drinking for centuries.
It is also a presentation of the life of an individual: André Besnier, who started the business at Laval in 1933; and ultimately of a group, Lactalis, who transformed his business from a craft into a state-of-the-art industry.

The Lactalis Group has become the largest milk and cheese producer in Europe and the world’s third-ranking milk production group.
The 4,000 objects and documents show the many changes that the rural world has experienced.

The World Academy of Milk Technology
Looking round the museum’s 5,000-square-metre display area will give you an overall picture of the activities connected with milk: producing it, collecting it and processing it to make powder, butter, cream, yoghurt, cheese and derivative products, as well as marketing, packaging, sponsorship and so on.
The collection of milk churns displayed is quite exceptional. It includes very rare items from France and the rest of the world. There are, for example, an Indian churn, a ‘sewing-machine’ churn that is operated by pedals (from Quebec), and churns from Africa, Greece, Hungary, etc.
Another impressive collection in the museum is the collection of Camembert labels, which tells the history of the promotion of milk products.
Thanks to the wealth of exhibits displayed, the museum has been given the status of ‘The World Academy of Milk Technology’.

Tasting tours
By the end of your visit you will understand all about how today’s wide range of milk products, along with the 1,000 or so varieties of French cheese, are the fruit of a long history and form part of our heritage.
A tour of the Milk Museum takes about 2½ hours and can, upon request, be extended to include workshops and tastings.
Themed and guided visits can also be arranged, subject to prior reservation, for individual visitors. They include a range of activities, take two hours and are based on the theme of ‘taste’.

More info